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in the civil rights movment." he joins us from washington. on the good to have you program. >> i wish i could be with you. wish we could have you in the studio. you have spent basically your life working on this icon a trilogy, and then you end up with a book that basically distills it all down. why did you do this? >> teachers have told me for many years that while they love the story, 800-page books are a little much to assign college students, let alone high school, and that weighed on me. the other thing is that it has been 50 years since the crest of the movement, and america's still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that -- america still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that. there are still many people hiding from the great benefits of the 1960's, so i wanted to do something to crystallize that. the lessons from the people in the civil rights era. tavis: what lessons do you think that the american public, by and large, as we approached the anniversary -- we will talk about that in a moment -- what do they still seem blind to? >> george wallace pledg
anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit and publish the definitive multi-volume edition, the papers of martin luther kinder
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
of american civil rights law and that happens at the same time at the same place and nobody's head explodes. i think the voting rights acted is really, really important. it's not so old that it seems like it doesn't aply. when i wanted to talk to somebody about it i talked to john lewis who was nearly killed on a bridge in selma less than a week before president johnson formed a session of congress to talk about what they did to the man in selma. john lewis is still in congress. there's no camera. we never get footage of what happens in there. it's weird to see antonin scalia in person. weird. >> jon: does he. i only read some of the transcripts of what he was saying. he was saying we've got to get rid of this because it's one of last invest yijs of racial preference. >> he said when congress reupped they looked into whether or not it was still necessary. ten months of debate, 21 hearings, 15,000 pages of evidence and in the senate they voted 98-0, yeah we still need but he said, yeah what does that vote mean. >> jon: didn't he say we told them to fix this in 2006 but clearly they can't or won
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
afternoon. my name is rachel roberts and i am the civil rights coordinator for the council on american islamic relations san francisco bay area office. i would first of all like to thank you on behalf of our organization for supporting this important resolution and i would especially like to acknowledge the commitment and hard work of supervisor chiu and his wonderful staff. thank you. those of us who come from marginalized communities know that in tightxv of great fear and prejudice that it is not politically easy to stand with communities that are being scapegoated. today you have made it clear to the world that san francisco will not give in too bigtry. over the past 24 hours, we have heard from many members of the american muslim community. we are here to share their gratitude for your bravery and your commitment to diversity and inclusion. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >>> the greatest miscarriage of justice was when jesus was killed. and when they came to the place which is called calvary, there they crucified him and the malefactors, one on the right hand and one on the
. thomas e perez currently oversees the civil rights division and to no one's surprise he has a long history of controversy. and don't take my word for it. when he was floated as a potential pick, jay adams had this to say about his former colleague when he spoke "the great one" mark levin. >> tell us about this fellow perez before he went into the justice department. >> well, he's a radical's radical, used to be maryland, and worked with the-- he's an extreme radical, anti-business, a racialist to the core. >> can you imagine this man in charge of the labor department, the total leapt. >> totally lawless, this is a man for whom law is a nuisance. >> joining me now with the reaction from americans for justice, jay sekulow and congressman dennis kucinich. you didn't like when the black panthers were outside with the batons the polling place in philly, you didn't like that. >> that case didn't have anything to do with secretary designate perez. >> actually, it did. the issue came up with the new black panther case in which the inspector general reviewed the case and supported the accus
of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years
to take on. mario, on his first disobedience arrests and then he became involved in civil rights movement to protect housing discrimination after a local real estate office refused to work with him because he was black. then there were a very significant first. first african american elected to san francisco in the california state assembly. the first african american speaker of the california state assembly. and as we all know the first african mayor of san francisco [ applause ] >> first, the first, the first. and a speaker of the assembly he would also become the first and the only politicians to hold that position for 15 years. longer than any other individual so much so that a new paradigm was created with prop 140 which instituted term limits. had that not happened and all likelihood, willie brown might still be speaker had he so desired the. [ [ applause ] >> it's worth noting that willie became speaker of the state assembly after the coalition of republican and democrats. 28 republicans, 23 democrats. some say this goes back to a period of more consilt tree and less contentious pa
leads the doj's civil rights division and could wind up being the next u.s. labor secretary. a cabinet member who will play a key role in the the president's efforts to raise the minimum wage and reform immigration laws among many other responsibilities, but with at least one former doj attorney describing mr. perez as a quote, radical radical who views the law as, quote, a nuisance, you can bet there's a fight over this man's nomination may get intense. chris stirewalt is our fox news digital power editor on power play.com live. tom perez's tenure heading up to the doj has been controversial to say the least, but he is beloved by those on the left as someone who embodies virtually all the principles they stand for. what does it say that president obama is proceeding with that nomination despite some of the controversies that emerged when he they floated the trial balloon earlier? >> well, in washington we can tell a lot more about somebody's intent by what they do than what they say. what we've heard a lot said of the white house of late is that they're interested in reaching out to r
polarization within the doj civil-rights unit. my next guest works at the doj before he resigned in 2010 over the department's dismissal of a new black panther party boater intimidation case. joining us now, former u.s. to pardon of justice attorney, author of the book in justice exposing the racial agenda of the obama justice department. good to have you with us. >> good to be here. lou: you have to feel vindicated by the doj inspector general's report. let's just share the findings. let me be clear, you have said that peres had provided false testimony. the ig report concludes and are we found the testimony did not reflect the entire story regarding the involvement of political appointees. we did not find press intentionally misled the commission. nevertheless, given he was testifying as an apartment witness before the commission we believe he should have some more details. your reaction? >> look. this is what we have been saying for years about this civil rights division. it has enormous power over business. call that a rat's nest. invested with racial animus. an inspector general report d
that could make a contentious battle. perez who heads the civil rights division at the justice department will have questions to answer, but the doj's decision to drop that now infamous voter intimidation case against the new black panther party, as well as a case headed to the supreme court that could have struck down his legal theories on racial discrimination, for more we're joined by editorial board member mary kissle and political diary editor jason riley. mary, you broke the story a year ago about the involvement in the st. paul case, we've since discovered a lot more details thanks to your digging. why did perez get himself involved in in case? >> well, the city of st. paul, minnesota was challenging, a theory of racial discrimination that tom perez and the justice department were using to accuse banks of discrimination, and so, he feared that if the court struck down this particular rule, that he would have to stop doing that, it would cut off a big source of funding, actually, for the justice department. >> so he leaned on st. paul to drop the case and they'd been litigating for
they were living in. they had to reflect the diversity of their workforce. it was a civil rights issue and also a business efficiency issue. we were dealing with domestic partnerships in other ways of trying to provide benefits and it was a complicated issue especially for companies with operations in multiple states. the feeling was let's do the right thing here, right for business, right for the human relations department, right for hiring right for retention right for civil rights. >> michael: your group, the chamber has supported gay marriage and gavin newsome battled to support it in francisco. was it a challenge to get people to agree to that? >> initially you might have thought like i did that maybe this was an issue that the community would not weigh in on. it was a non-direct business issue. we took it to public policy process with dozens of members who helped to form our public policy position to our board of directors over 06 members. unanimously directed the chamber to weigh in in the litigation of 2007, and we continue to do that on the most recent litigation. and it wasn'
. president obama wants the assistant attorney general for the justice department's civil rights division, thomas perez to be the next secretary of labor. mr. perez is seen by some to be a racial activist. here now to explain attorney and fox news anchor megyn kelly. you are actually covering this on your show. >> yeah. >> bill: that's high brow. >> we do some news on the news show. >> bill: nobody cares about the secretary of labor. most people don't care and i don't blame them. i don't care either. however, however, this appointment that president obama wants to make, this could be very telling about president obama. >> yeah. >> bill: tell me about perez. >> president obama's critics have been saying this sun necessarily divisive this choice. it would be hard to get somebody farther to the left than mr. perez and already some senators are threatening to try to block his confirmation because they believe he has been as one critic put it as quote a radical's radical. the deal with -- look, perez he went to harvard law school. he has experience in labor at the department of labor from mary
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers, hawaii supreme court found the state ban own same-sex marriage violated its constitution. almost immediately shall the state specific ruling sparked campaigns across the country to deny marriage rights to same sex couples. launching a preemptive strike against marriage equality more than 30 states passed defense of marriage laws putting pressure on the federal government to follow suit and in 1996, president bill clinton, the democrat, he signed the federal defense of marriage act restricting the definition of marriag
of labor. he comes directly from the department of justice where he's the head of the civil rights division, the division responsible for enforcing federal discrimination statutes. white house officials point to the fact that he helped settle the three largest fair lending cases in the department history as some of the reasons why he should be the head over at labor. however, republicans are pointing to a report issued by the department of justice's i.g. last week, the inspector general that basically said that division that perez leads is still in two camps. they're examples of harassment, inappropriate personnel attacks and the i.g.'s report basically found all those issues predate president obama's tenure in office. however, they really haven't been addressed to the satisfaction of the i.g., inspector general, thus far. mr. perez says he's worked with the department, that there have been improvements since he's taken office there but a number of republicans are pointing to this, especially senator grassley saying that mr. perez is woefully unprepared to answer questions about this. remem
his civil rights movement to a human rights movement. meaningful equality was not to be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great a
is the object of civil rights movement. but they never have jojo as a child. but the reader identifies with horton. he's our man can ease our guy. he is our floppy nice element -- nice elephant who is saving someone like me. but he lives in the jungle with a kangaroo give this is not the readers everyday world. --t is the world of google of hooville. that is the world of dr. seuss's child reader. it's as if horton is a mega planet saving the tiny planet earth. or maybe given the socio- specificity of hooville, the modern west. so when the mayor urges for a last voice to make the hoos h crib somestarts on a path where a tiny figure dressed in crimson stands alone. his noses in the air. there is a smirk on his face. he knows what is going on and he doesn't care. he is the kind of child who in 50 stock is cruising for a bruising. who, in 1950s talk, is cruising for a bruising. the mayor grabs the young twerp. leading him up the tower and there is a wonderful bouncing scene where jojo is on the outstretched hand of the mayor and is ready to make a big statement. he clears his throat and he
to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
series on civil rights continues with filmmaker, keith beauchamp. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >> michael: a federal judge began hearing testimony today to determine if policemen have been stopping people unconstitutionally. defenders of the program state has brought down gun violence but they say at its core it is racial profiling that violates the constitution. joining me now is keith beauchamp, keith direct theed the documentary "the untold story of emmett louis till" and hosts the "the injustice files: hood of suspicion" which examines contemporary cases of racial profiling. keith welcome to "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> michael: keith, new york saw 419 murders last year. the lowest numbers since record keeping began in the 1960s, so is this a small price to pay for a safer community? >> i think it causes a bigger problem. you are talk about statistically if you look at these cases out of 1 in 1,000 cases of those stops, you have actual gun violations. when you take a look at the percentage of those being stopped, out of 90% there are no arrest o
peace with the palestinians by painting it as a civil rights issue in personal terms. >> put yourself in their shoes. look at the world through their eyes. it is not fair that a palestinian child cannot grow up in a state of their own. spending their entire lives with the presence of a foreign army that controls the movements not just of those young people, their parents and grandparents every single day. neither occupation nor expulsion is the answer. just as israelis built a state in their homeland, palestinians have a right to be a free people in their own land. >> mr. obama also stressed the unbreakable alliance between israel and the utsz. >> make no mistake, those who adhere to the ideologically of rejecting israel's right to exist, they might as well reject the earth beneath them or the sky above because israel's not going anywhere. today, i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there's no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, [ speaking foreign language ] . you are not alone. >> the speech was reminiscent of remarks the president gave
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
insurance. >>> this week marks the 48th anniversary of the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to montgomery, alabama. harry belafonte recruited tony bennett to march with him it happened has marchers tried to cross the bridge, known as bloody sunday. the message of civil rights still permeates today. >> selma was different, that they were willing to kill, bomb, burn, destroy, so to ask our people to go there was a whole different game. >> he remembers the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not along at 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody selma happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it, what was the mood? >> the mood was the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and this kind of mayhem. the bottom line was that we go back as often as necessary. >> belafonte, enlisted by dr. king to bring artists into the movement, convinced the likes of joan baez, paul newman and marlon brando, bu
at the forefront of the discussion. many see them as the civil rights issues of our time. we must be a party that is welcoming and inconclusive for all voters. sean, put ago side how candidates look, does that mean you'll look for candidates that are more accepting for things like same-sex marriage? >> no, what it means and this is something that ronald reagan said in practice, which means my 80% sfrend not my 20% enemy. the principles are sound. is this not a question of how do we change the party or the principles. what it is, it's saying we as a party, if we want to grow and we want to win and govern again, at the presidential level, we've got to look at times and said, hey, you may not agree eye us on every single issue that the party has put out there, but we're willing to include you in the party as long as you understand. >> doesn't this conflict with some of the messaging we've heard from cpac over the weekend, though? >> there are personal some speakers at cpac who don't believe otherwise. i would argue while cpac does represent a good amount of people that believe in the republican
by recalling lifelong support the civil rights movement also opined the brief was legally correct. jay stanley pottinger the assistant attorney general for civil rights argued strenuously against filing. he made three points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only
amos brown to present the plaque to mayor brown's unwavering commitment to civil rights. [ applause ] >> thank you richard brown. it's good to see you and thank you dr. parkel. that's all i got. i could listen to him talk all day. that was fantastic. >> christina, would you like to come up again? >> thank you. we have a few special thank yous that we want to wrap the ceremony up with. if vernal, elsie and deanna if you can please come up. we would really appreciate it. and so behalf on the mayor's office we would like to say thank you deeply for your contribution for making these services such a success. >> thank you. >> they are beautiful. >> for you. we have certificates of honor on behalf of the mayor's services. we are good at making certificates of honor. >> thank you. >> okay. and thank you to everybody for your contribution, your time and commitment to showing up today. the sponsors, we appreciate your support. now that concludes our ceremony. please enjoy the reception. thank you. (music) >> herb theatre,open rehearsal. listen to the rehearsal. i think it is fun for them, t
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